Dog Noses- Subjective or Objective Evidence? - Page 2 - Utah Wildlife Network

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Old 02-02-2020, 02:49 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Interesting question, Caddis8. My guess is similar to others--the dog comes as a package deal and they aren't selecting it strictly for the strength of its nose. However, I know a breeder in UT who occasionally places his Wirehaired pointing griffons as Search and Rescue dogs, including avalanche work.
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Old 02-03-2020, 09:40 AM   #12 (permalink)
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What about Beagles? They're notoriously tough to train. But that is a very good thought I hadn't considered.
Well...

I'd have to say you gotta have a few beagles cuz they are sooo cute.
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Old 02-03-2020, 09:55 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Well...

I'd have to say you gotta have a few beagles cuz they are sooo cute.
Neighbor used to have a beagle. It stopped being cute when it howled and barked whenever we were out in the yard, at my house.

But our friends had a beagle that was a rescue dog. It was a little grumpy, but didn't make much noise.

Had friends with a beagle and that dog didn't last 2 years with them before they gave it away. Barked, bawled, and dug through the fence. They replaced with a bassett hound mix. HATED that dog. It was food aggressive, territorial, wouldn't listen, and was a generally terrible dog. I put a lot of that on the owner of the dog, however.

Good dogs are made, not bred. A dog with great breeding is still subject to the owner and can be turned to a moron quickly.
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Old 02-03-2020, 05:16 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Well...

I'd have to say you gotta have a few beagles cuz they are sooo cute.
i lived next to two beagles. that won't ever happen again.
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Old 02-05-2020, 04:39 PM   #15 (permalink)
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I’ve had English Pointers, Springers and Labs!! Currently utilizing a pointing lab!! Great nose!! I did see Springers being used in the UK for contraband and drugs! To each their own!!
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Old 02-05-2020, 08:43 PM   #16 (permalink)
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There's a book I read years ago before I got my first Belgian sheepdog for SAR called "The intelligence of dogs." Definitely outdated now, but it's a very practical book that was a good read and influenced my thinking on training, breed characteristics, and canines' capabilities.
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Old 02-05-2020, 10:28 PM   #17 (permalink)
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My lab has a terrible nose but amazing ears. She can hear our refrigerator open while she is outside during a thunderstorm on the 4th of July with a marching band playing down the street.
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Old 02-06-2020, 10:12 AM   #18 (permalink)
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My lab has a terrible nose but amazing ears. She can hear our refrigerator open while she is outside during a thunderstorm on the 4th of July with a marching band playing down the street.
We must have litter mates. Every time my wife thinks the dogs might be deaf she carefully unwraps a string cheese and they magically appear from the furthest corner of the house.
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Old 03-29-2020, 08:32 PM   #19 (permalink)
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As long as we are comparing noses I must say my Chessie had the best nose of any dog I have seen - I have had and hunted with Labs, Goldens and Drahts - most Chessie owners say the same thing about their dogs - for whatever reason it seems like the Chessie's don't get the credit they should - probably why the breed is still predictable.
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Old 03-30-2020, 06:17 PM   #20 (permalink)
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I used to be a K9 Handler (ran 2 separate Bomb Dogs). I've seen a few Drahthaar's being utilized as detection dogs lately. Breed selection is based on the Olfactory system, essentially the longer the snout the better the Olfactory system (theoretically, individual dogs vary). Therefore, hounds with their long snouts have the highest potential of having the best sniffer, then working down from their. This is why you don't see pugs, bull dogs, boxers etc. used as detection dogs. However, selecting an individual dog should be based on the individual dogs natural drives and abilities. The higher the dogs hunt drive, the more they will use their nose to "hunt". You could have a really high hunt drive lab and low hunt drive hound and the lab will out perform the hound in locating prey every time.

So, to answer your question, Drive is the #1 most important thing, followed by trainability. If you don't have those 2 things you have a nice yard ornament. If you have those 2 things, you're going to have a ton of fun with your dog if you put in the work, irregardless of breed.
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