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Old 09-01-2020, 01:04 AM   #21 (permalink)
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The table fare quality is second to none, and if you insist on shooting them far away from the truck, fawns and calves are very easy to dress and pack out
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Old 09-01-2020, 07:50 AM   #22 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by johnnycake View Post
The table fare quality is second to none, and if you insist on shooting them far away from the truck, fawns and calves are very easy to dress and pack out
I honestly haven't ever thought of the meat being that muh better... But I haven't known anyone that has shot a calf or fawn.

If I remember correctly, didn't you have a post showing some dry aging you did for something like 60 days? Are you or have you worked as a chef? I've got to try aging at some point. I work in the brewing industry, so microbes and fermentation are right up my alley!!

I don't think my wife would go for shooting a calf. We had one about 5 feet from us and it was staring her down... I thought I'd completely lost her as a hunter for a moment!
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Old 09-01-2020, 08:00 AM   #23 (permalink)
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And I am apparently not tight lipped enough. I've got to get with the program!
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Old 09-01-2020, 11:03 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Fawns and calves are veal--tender, mild, and sweet. I love keeping a hindquarter whole on the bone and roasting it for a big family dinner. Antelope fawns I will often keep one of them whole, just dressed and skinned then cook it like a whole lamb. Usually they can fit on a grill.

Yeah, I once went to culinary school and worked as a chef, had a catering company, and then spent a handful of years as a scratch baker. That was fun, but the hours and pay are better being a lawyer!

That dry aging stuff with my bison was a riot! Those steaks are pretty great, and I've had fun with them over the past several months.
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Old 09-01-2020, 05:40 PM   #25 (permalink)
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My advise...change your wife's mind about calves! What's not to like? They are still as big as a mature buck, the meat is the best there is in the woods, and two people can pack one out without any trouble at all. Even with one person, a packout is doable, but it's gonna hurt some. My further advise would be that if your wife cannot be swayed and actually shoots a 400 lb. cow, then you should load her pack up to the max with meat and have her put it on. I bet her attitude changes shortly thereafter.

If you insist on hunting 10 miles back, get 3 or 4 volunteers to go in and help you pack it out. That will make your experience so much better than a grueling death march. Usually, volunteers can be had with a cut in on the spoils.

My longest packout on an elk was 6.5 miles. I had 4 helpers and it was a really enjoyable experience. That said, we started in at 6am and didn't get out until 6:30pm. If you're back 10 miles, that is a REALLY long ways WITH help!

But I'm with Johnnycake - if you're going in 10 miles, just shoot a calf! Your wife might even mandate it after those first couple steaks or roasts...if you can convince her to shoot one first.
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Old 09-01-2020, 06:32 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Yes, it would be insane to pack a head attached to a quarter. But then you also have to pack out the antlers also.

As I also said you don't have to pack out the organs themselves but the sack

i've never heard that before. i leave my dogs chew toys out in the wild for the coyotes. not worth the weight, imo.

i bring an attached nipple or testicle back with me for good luck.
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Old 09-01-2020, 06:40 PM   #27 (permalink)
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i'm on the calf train when i have multiple tags. much easier to pack and very tasty.

MWScott, the op is a different breed when it comes to long walks in the woods. i see that type of sick in the head all the time at work. mental fortitude and a diesel engine seems to be the common thread. it's a rare occurrence when you can talk them out of doing something their mind is set on.

rtock, good luck on the hunt.
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Old 09-01-2020, 06:43 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by johnnycake View Post
Fawns and calves are veal--tender, mild, and sweet. I love keeping a hindquarter whole on the bone and roasting it for a big family dinner. Antelope fawns I will often keep one of them whole, just dressed and skinned then cook it like a whole lamb. Usually they can fit on a grill.

Yeah, I once went to culinary school and worked as a chef, had a catering company, and then spent a handful of years as a scratch baker. That was fun, but the hours and pay are better being a lawyer!

That dry aging stuff with my bison was a riot! Those steaks are pretty great, and I've had fun with them over the past several months.
Now if a calf walks in front of me while I'm with my wife I'll be so tempted to shoot it!!
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Old 09-01-2020, 07:10 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by MWScott72 View Post
My advise...change your wife's mind about calves! What's not to like? They are still as big as a mature buck, the meat is the best there is in the woods, and two people can pack one out without any trouble at all. Even with one person, a packout is doable, but it's gonna hurt some. My further advise would be that if your wife cannot be swayed and actually shoots a 400 lb. cow, then you should load her pack up to the max with meat and have her put it on. I bet her attitude changes shortly thereafter.[IMG class=inlineimg]https://utahwildlife.net/forum/images/smilies/icon_biggrin.gif[/IMG]

If you insist on hunting 10 miles back, get 3 or 4 volunteers to go in and help you pack it out. That will make your experience so much better than a grueling death march. Usually, volunteers can be had with a cut in on the spoils.

My longest packout on an elk was 6.5 miles. I had 4 helpers and it was a really enjoyable experience. That said, we started in at 6am and didn't get out until 6:30pm. If you're back 10 miles, that is a REALLY long ways WITH help!

But I'm with Johnnycake - if you're going in 10 miles, just shoot a calf! Your wife might even mandate it after those first couple steaks or roasts...if you can convince her to shoot one first.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnycake View Post
Fawns and calves are veal--tender, mild, and sweet. I love keeping a hindquarter whole on the bone and roasting it for a big family dinner. Antelope fawns I will often keep one of them whole, just dressed and skinned then cook it like a whole lamb. Usually they can fit on a grill.

Yeah, I once went to culinary school and worked as a chef, had a catering company, and then spent a handful of years as a scratch baker. That was fun, but the hours and pay are better being a lawyer!

That dry aging stuff with my bison was a riot! Those steaks are pretty great, and I've had fun with them over the past several months.
Now if a calf walks in front of me while I'm with my wife I'll be so tempted to shoot it!!
Tempted? You’re still not getting it!
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Old 09-01-2020, 07:12 PM   #30 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by MWScott72 View Post
My advise...change your wife's mind about calves! What's not to like? They are still as big as a mature buck, the meat is the best there is in the woods, and two people can pack one out without any trouble at all. Even with one person, a packout is doable, but it's gonna hurt some. My further advise would be that if your wife cannot be swayed and actually shoots a 400 lb. cow, then you should load her pack up to the max with meat and have her put it on. I bet her attitude changes shortly thereafter.[IMG class=inlineimg]https://utahwildlife.net/forum/images/smilies/icon_biggrin.gif[/IMG]

If you insist on hunting 10 miles back, get 3 or 4 volunteers to go in and help you pack it out. That will make your experience so much better than a grueling death march. Usually, volunteers can be had with a cut in on the spoils.

My longest packout on an elk was 6.5 miles. I had 4 helpers and it was a really enjoyable experience. That said, we started in at 6am and didn't get out until 6:30pm. If you're back 10 miles, that is a REALLY long ways WITH help!

But I'm with Johnnycake - if you're going in 10 miles, just shoot a calf! Your wife might even mandate it after those first couple steaks or roasts...if you can convince her to shoot one first.
She just thinks the calves are so cute she couldn't possibly shoot one!

And we're just going out together for archery this weekend in the area I've been hunting and learning, so the packout for that shouldn't be more than a couple miles one way. If I come up empty handed on the rifle hunt, I may seek out a calf with my bow for the remainder of the season, so maybe that will convince her.

Now, if I had an anterless rifle tag.... Johnnycake has me thinking I'd shoot a calf 10 miles out!
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